'Sunrise Ruby' Steals the Show at Sotheby's Auction

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The “Sunrise Ruby,” a 25.59-carat untreated pigeon’s blood red-colored stone set a new world auction record for price paid for a ruby on Tuesday at the Sotheby's Geneva sale. The ruby was initially estimated to sell at between $12-$18 million but bidding soared to $30.3 million, demolishing the existing ruby auction record that was held by the $8.6 million sale of the “Graff Ruby.” The ring also set a record for the price paid for a jewel by Cartier. It was sold to an million to an anonymous buyer.
The high price of the ruby heavily contributed to the Sotheby’s Magnificent and Noble Jewels auction which the highest-ever total for any jewelry auction at $160.9 million, deposing the Christie’s November 2014 sale of Magnificent Jewels in Geneva, which totaled $150.2 million.

Also performing well but not meeting pre-sale expectations was the “Historic Pink." The 8.72-carat fancy vivid pink diamond sold for $15.9 million, below its pre-sale high estimate of $18 million.
David Bennett, worldwide chairman of Sotheby’s international jewelry division had this to say about the sale: 
“(The) record result is the reflection of outstanding quality of the pieces in the sale across the board,...The galleries have been brimming with collectors during our worldwide exhibitions, and this translated into lively bidding throughout the sale … with truly global demand for the finest diamonds, gemstones and signed pieces of the very highest order.”

The entirety of the auction results can be viewed at Sotheby's 

The Graff Ruby Lead the Sotheby's Geneva Sale

The cushion-shaped ruby weighing 8.62 carats, set between triangular diamond shoulders within a mount decorated throughout with brilliant-cut diamonds,   size 59, signed Graff, together with an alternative ring mount, Graff. Photo Courtesy of Sothebys

The cushion-shaped ruby weighing 8.62 carats, set between triangular diamond shoulders within a mount decorated throughout with brilliant-cut diamonds, size 59, signed Graff, together with an alternative ring mount, Graff. Photo Courtesy of Sothebys

The November 12th, 2014 Sotheby's Geneva auction was lead by a truly magnificent pigeon-blood colored ruby known as the "Graff Ruby".  The ring was originally sold at auction nine years ago and was purchased by noted jeweller Laurence Graff for a record breaking price. He later named the ruby "The Graff Ruby". 
In Geneva the ring again fetched a record breaking amount (selling for $8,600,410). The ring was part of the Collection of Dimitri Mavrommatis (16 pieces) which also included a rare 27.54 carat step-cut Kashmir sapphire, as well as several pieces by contemporary jewelers, Graff and JAR (who was represented by a pair of superb sapphire, ruby and diamond earrings).

The step-cut sapphire weighing 27.54 carats, set between pear-shaped diamond shoulders  , size 53, together with an alternative ring mount, Graff. Photo Courtesy of Sothebys

The step-cut sapphire weighing 27.54 carats, set between pear-shaped diamond shoulders, size 53, together with an alternative ring mount, Graff. Photo Courtesy of Sothebys

The "Graff" Ruby information:
The piece was accompanied by Gübelin report stating that the ruby is of Burmese origin, with no indications of heating. The SSEF report together with a letter stating:
"The Graff Ruby...The described gemstones exhibits an impressive weight and purity, combined with a very pleasant shape and cutting style. The faint inclusions found by microscopic inspection represent the hallmarks of the reputed deposit of Mogok in Burma (Myanmar). The stone has been spared to exposure of thermal treatment and its clarity and colour are natural. Its vivid red, poetically referred to as 'pigeon blood' is due to a combination of well balanced trace elements in the stone, typical and characteristic for rubies of the Mogok gemstone tract. Natural Mogok rubies from this size, colour and clarity represent a great rarity and the Graff ruby with its combination of outstanding characteristics is a very exceptional gemstone."